East Middle School

East Middle School
East Middle School

East Middle School

JOPLIN, MISSOURI

  • Joplin School District
  • New Construction
  • 125,800 SF total
  • $30.4 million

A shared building with a well-defined threshold eases the transition from elementary to middle school, while a bold, vibrant color palette set this young adult space apart from elementary.

Sharing a site with Soaring Heights Elementary School, it’s important that the architecture, design and environmental graphics emphasize the maturity, focus and confidence that comes with young adulthood.

This school replaces the middle school lost on May 22, 2011, when the worst tornado disaster on record to date in the United States hit to the City of Joplin. The Superintendent called this effort “Operation Rebuild.”

Olathe West High School

Olathe West High School

OLATHE, KANSAS

  • Olathe USD 233
  • New Construction
  • 375,000 SF
  • $85 million
  • Design Partner: Stantec Architecture

Learning is on display at this one-of-a-kind high school.

From the moment students walk in the door, they’re greeted with the media center and the 21st Century Learning program labs. Student socialization and collaboration are encouraged with two learning stairs connecting academic neighborhoods.

Academic neighborhoods house a variety of spaces from flexible labs to blended learning environments, giving the school a more collegiate feel. No teacher owns their classroom, but rather chooses the environment that will work best for that day’s lesson.

AWARDS & RECOGNITION

  • AIA Kansas – Citation Award in Large Architecture
  • A4LE Midwest Great Lakes – John Shaw Award

Liberty North High School

Liberty North High School Additions

LIBERTY, MISSOURI

  • Liberty Public Schools
  • Additions
  • 42,000 SF total
  • $9 million

This addition embraces a new way of learning for the District. Flexible learning spaces create a culture of collaboration that is unlike any other part of the building.

The existing high school is a traditional learning environment with conventional classrooms that branch off central corridors. With the two-story addition, the District wanted to do more with less – more opportunities for learning in the smaller addition. So, every space is a space for learning. Corridors include furniture that can be used for break-out groups or one-on-one instruction, and classrooms are highly flexible to encourage a variety of teaching styles.

Summit Ridge Middle School

Summit Ridge
Summit Ridge

Summit Ridge Middle School

LITTLETON, COLORADO

  • Jefferson County Public Schools
  • Addition/Renovation
  •  13,000 SF
  • $4.8 million

Visual connectivity and strategically designed collaborative spaces have led to an evolution of learning styles at this newly combined middle school. 

Jeffco Public Schools in Denver, Colorado recently decided to transition their sixth-grade students into middle-school, and needed to accommodate for the addition of 400 students. The existing building hosted traditional classrooms and learning areas, challenging the design team to seamlessly integrate the two buildings while incorporating collaborative learning elements into the addition. Hollis + Miller worked directly with the principal, faculty, community members, and students to create a design that would introduce collaboration spaces and a learning stair alongside new classrooms and science labs. Renovations to the school’s STEAM classrooms allow more students access to hands on education with computer aided design, engineering, and fabrication.

Soaring Heights Elementary School

Soaring Heights Elementary School

JOPLIN, MISSOURI

  • Joplin School District
  • New Construction
  • 66,500 SF total
  • $13.5 million

One-of-a-kind collaborative spaces encourage impromptu idea sharing and intimate one-on-one learning.

The Learning Park, Tree House and Theatre in the Park are all flexible learning spaces unique to Soaring Heights. The flexible design emboldens educators and students to adapt their learning environment to the lesson.

This school replaces the elementary school lost on May 22, 2011, when the worst tornado disaster on record to date in the United States hit the City of Joplin.

Joplin Early Childhood Center

Joplin Early Childhood Center

JOPLIN, MISSOURI

  • Joplin School District
  • New Construction
  • 37,500 SF
  • $8.7 million

After seven years in temporary classrooms, Joplin’s littlest learners finally have a home for learning and exploring. This is “Where it all Begins…”

Teachers can now collaborate together to utilize shared learning centers that are integral to their early education curriculum, rather than having to house these centers in their classrooms, which has freed up space in their rooms for more individual and group learning.

It was important for the Joplin community that their Early Childhood Center feels more like a home than a school to ease the transition for students. This space comes alive thanks to the integration of the environmental graphics. Students and visitors are immersed in a forest of trees and critters. The Learning Grove opens learners’ imaginations with construction and waterplay stations, as well as a tricycle track, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor learning.

In May 2011, an F-5 tornado struck the city of Joplin, devastating the community. The District’s early childhood center is the last piece of Operation Rebuild.

AWARDS & RECOGNITION

  • IIDA Mid-America – Silver Award in K-12 Education
  • AIA Kansas City – Citation Award in Interior Architecture

Joplin Early Childhood Center

JOPLIN, MISSOURI

  • Joplin School District
  • New Construction
  • 37,500 SF
  • $8.7 million

After seven years in temporary classrooms, Joplin’s littlest learners finally have a home for learning and exploring. This is “Where it all Begins…”

Teachers can now collaborate together to utilize shared learning centers that are integral to their early education curriculum, rather than having to house these centers in their classrooms, which has freed up space in their rooms for more individual and group learning.

It was important for the Joplin community that their Early Childhood Center feels more like a home than a school to ease the transition for students. This space comes alive thanks to the integration of the environmental graphics. Students and visitors are immersed in a forest of trees and critters. The Learning Grove opens learners’ imaginations with construction and waterplay stations, as well as a tricycle track, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor learning.

In May 2011, an F-5 tornado struck the city of Joplin, devastating the community. The District’s early childhood center is the last piece of Operation Rebuild.

Trailwood Elementary School

Trailwood Elementary School

OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS

  • Shawnee Mission School District
  • New Construction
  • 68,000 SF total
  • $16.9 million

Every space is an opportunity for learning. Described as a “dream school,” Trailwood focuses on hands-on, experiential learning.

Corridors that would traditionally be meant for travel are transformed into work areas with soft seating, tables and easily accessible technology. Accommodating 550 students grades pre-kindergarten through fifth grade, the Principal and community are excited about the possibilities this unique design provides.

Safety was a paramount concern throughout the design and construction because this new elementary school was built next to the existing facility, which stayed open and operational throughout construction. Careful coordination between the District, our team and JE Dunn’s construction team was paramount to ensure students and faculty at the existing school stayed safe and secure.

Hopewell Elementary School

HOPEWELL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

  • Park Hill School District
  • New Construction
  • 73,000 SF
  • $18.1 million

Indoor and outdoor exploration are encouraged through colorful environmental graphics, reinforced by nature.

Positioned atop a hill and nestled within trees, Park Hill School District’s new Hopewell Elementary is a sanctuary for discovery. 600 students, grades K-5, have the opportunity to use every square foot inside and out of the building for learning. Traditional hallways have been molded with flexible collaboration spaces to maximize flexibility and efficiency. Every core classroom has their own glass garage door, allowing teachers the opportunity to open into collaboration and project spaces. The art room looks out upon a patio facing the tree line, inspiring creativity in students and spilling natural light into the learning environment. The durable materials used on the exterior of the building will withstand the elements and provide a timeless look for generations of students to come in the future.