Summit Trail Middle School

Summit Trail Middle School

OLATHE, KANSAS

  • Olathe Public Schools
  • New Construction
  • 140,000 SF
  • $31 million

Learning has no bounds at the new Summit Trail Middle School.

In order to accommodate their growing student population, Olathe Public School’s needed a 10th middle school. Adapted from their most recently completed middle school, Summit Trail provides a familiar and functional space while pushing the boundaries of customized learning.

Open corridors blur the line of circulation and usable space. Located in each learning pod are “genius bars” with fully integrated technology for small group collaboration. Glazing provides transparency from classrooms to common spaces, encouraging breakout participation. Moveable furniture elevates the learning environment by providing students and teachers the flexibility to customize their space at any given moment.

Staley High School

Originally designed from the ground up by Hollis + Miller in 2009, Staley High School recently brought the team back on to design two major additions for academics and athletics.

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Rising Hill and Northview Elementary Schools

RISING HILL AND NORTHVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
RISING HILL AND NORTHVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Rising Hill and Northview Elementary Schools

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

  • North Kansas City School District
  • New Construction
  • Rising Hill: $20 million & 58,000 SF
  • Northview: $21.7 million & 70,900 SF
  • LEED Certified

Designed in tandem, Rising Hill and Northview Elementary Schools provide flexible, collaborative spaces that serve every type of learner.

Reinforcing a district-wide emphasis on literacy, the heart of these two schools are spacious, exposed media centers that push the envelope of a traditional library. Students have opportunities to gather on a learning stair for lessons, collaborate in smaller groups, or focus in a nook on an independent project or to enjoy their favorite book.

The academic neighborhoods set the stage for differentiated learning, accommodating every type of lesson and learner. Classrooms with garage doors are adjacent to collaborative spaces, amplifying space for group activities, breakout sessions or individualized learning. Writeable locker surfaces give students a sense of pride and ownership of their space, reinforcing an environment that is truly designed for the students.

As a forward-thinking district, the two elementary schools contain individual, single occupancy bathroom stalls that promote safety and privacy to ensure that every student feels comfortable in their environment.

Learnscape-Park Hill School District

The Russell Jones Education Center offers educational programs to identified special education students from kindergarten through twelfth grade who have emotional and behavioral concerns. The learning approach targets specific skill deficits using data-based decision making.

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EPiC Elementary School

EPiC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

LIBERTY, MISSOURI

  • Liberty Public Schools
  • Adaptive Reuse
  • 30,000 SF
  • $1.8 Million

Re-imagining a former administrative building created innovative environments for all elementary school students while saving District resources and accommodating rapid population growth. Students at EPiC are encouraged to push the boundaries of what an educational space can be.

The team set out to do more with less, designing spaces that were flexible and multi-functional and support learning at all times. The District owned space in a nearby office building. By moving their administrative office into this space, it opened up space for a learning environment without the expense of designing a new building.

The former District Administrative Center was re-imagined into EPiC Elementary School, an innovative project-based learning environment where “Every Person is Inspired to Create.” Designed to support 300 students, EPiC looks at space differently than a traditional school. Every square foot of the building is viewed as a learning space, supporting student group work.  Hollis + Miller designed flexible, multipurpose classrooms where students are exposed to project-based learning and educational technology. The learning environment also fosters individual learning and encourages discovery. This is an environment where children choose their adventure and have the opportunity to learn however they learn best.

I really felt comfortable explaining my ideas to Hollis + Miller, and the best part was that they would take our ideas and expand upon them.

–Dr. Michelle Schmitz

Brookwood Elementary School

BROOKWOOD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

LEAWOOD, KANSAS

  • Shawnee Mission School District
  • New Construction
  • 76,800 SF
  • $17.3 Million

The walls and floors come to life as avenues for learning and exploration.

Home to over 550 students, the Brookwood Beaver pride shines through in the building’s design. The original mascot, Oscar, is incorporated throughout the building, a nod to proud alumni of the previous Brookwood Elementary School. A mixture of colors and texture mimic those found in nature, and you’ll find a beaver den nestled under the learning stairs that provides a special place for students to socialize or study.

The built environment at Brookwood encourages learning through exploration. As students make their way through the corridors, subtle wayfinding cues and interactive environmental graphics inspire student engagement and spark inquiry. Beyond the interior walls are learning tools integrated onto the building’s façade – a central sun dial and diagram of the lunar phases.

Ervin Early Learning Center

Ervin Early Learning Center

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

  • Hickman Mills School District
  • Renovation
  • 110,000 SF total
  • $7.5 million

Repurposing an abandoned middle school gave pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students a space their own focused on literacy.

Research shows that students who do not have an early education focused on literacy are more likely to struggle throughout school and into adulthood. This dedicated brain-based facility for young learners allowed the District to put an emphasis on this issue without committing more square footage to Kindergarten. It also gave the District more classroom space within each elementary school for older grade levels.

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